KILLED in CARS

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KILLED in CARS is a 'thank you' to the musicians who enrich my life, and a way to reach people curious about expression through sound.

This site has thrived as a destination for discussion and listening thanks to its disregard for the canon and its dedication to making esoteric genres accessible. I appreciate your readership, and I hope that you choose to participate!

PROMOS: I only accept physical promos, not downloads. If you believe your music fits my site, please send your tapes/CDs/vinyl to:

KILLED in CARS
2644 N 192nd Terrace Ct
Apt #3A
Elkhorn, NE 68022

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Posts tagged Techno

Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996) NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008) Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004) Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)
Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.
Zoom Info
Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996) NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008) Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004) Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)
Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.
Zoom Info
Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996) NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008) Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004) Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)
Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.
Zoom Info
Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996) NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008) Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004) Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)
Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.
Zoom Info
Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996) NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008) Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004) Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)
Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.
Zoom Info

Blue - Mexican Church (Emissions Audio Output, 1996)
NHK - Unununium (Raster-Noton, 2008)
Ricardo Villalobos - Thé au Harem d’Archimède (Perlon, 2004)
Photek - Modus Operandi (Science, 1997)
Child’s View - Funfair (Bubble Core, 1999)


Given the dramatic shift in this blog towards a wide range of electronic music, it’s sort of surprising that the original iteration of the site had, by my estimation, maybe two dozen electronic releases. This post, another in a long line of “multiple posts,” collects a few of those releases along with very temporary uploads. Click the album title to snag each.

Each of these is a good record, with two of them (Blue and Child’s View) being contributions from other writers (Doc and Alex, respectively). They’re altogether “lighter” (read: more fun, not dumber) that what gets posted to the site nowadays. They’re either breakbeat songs, more or less, drum & bass and glitch genre exercises (in the case of Photek and NHK), or a slight variation on house (for RV).

Anyway, these are the slim pickings that support what’s become almost an electronic subgenre blog (juke, industrial techno, etc.). The links will last about a week, so check them out.

Here is a mix I made to illustrate the concepts I talk about here. These tracks hail from around the world, and illustrate the increased intensity of repetition in many forms of music. Perhaps our taste for music evolved to sense emotion in modes, thus that’s our nature. However, it could be that emotive power will evolve to become secondary to the propulsive energy of repetition. This nurturing of repetition will eventually lead to the beat being as second nature as melody. Will a bass beat carry the same emotion as a mode one day? Does it already?

Here is the best track off of G.H.’s Ground, a 2011 EP of bass-heavy techno/dub-techno. This particular track reminds me of a Tommy Four Seven track I posted last year, although this one gets to the pleasure-inducing vocal fuckery much quicker, and with more aggression. This entire EP is heavy on the bass, so you’re missing a lot without the requisite thud in the mix. Enjoy!

Tommy Four Seven - Primate (CLR, 2011)


I have posted a track of this here, and if you want an interview with the artist about the album, RA had a good one (here). As I mentioned on the Facebook page, I’m in a techno phase, or maybe more accurately, techno’s current mood is much to my liking. Indeed, T47 said that this is considered (by him) to be club music. I just don’t understand how that is the case, and that’s excluding the tracks on this disc that aren’t 4/4.

What is here is much like the Andy Stott album I’m going to review (track in a mix here), which is a sort of 4/4, but so much more. There is the dub techno feel to this, with the bass billowy, a sort of furry dandelion echo with a bouncing ball at the center of the sound. Around this is a heightened dissonance, where bass interaction around the central activity wavers and fluctuates, not unlike residue from experiencing the Doppler effect. While I love this sound, it is what surrounds it that sets Primate apart.

Primate has some of the best engineering I’ve heard on a techno record, and the reason I say that is that integrated elements (such as brushwork, scraped textures, vocal elements) are distinct from the bass pulses (that is, they aren’t drowned in bass, despite the volume and saturation of the bass), but feel like they’re part of the song instead of being distinct layers without much common structural purpose. Each of these little elements seems to be paired with at least one other sound, so what you’re left with are deft combinations of textures that indicate movement in a way that makes the pulsing bass seem like a contrasting movement. The end result, then, is a great deal of texture and dynamism which masks the mostly linear nature of the tracks.

In the track that is posted, you’ll hear vocal snippets layered and transformed, and this was what initially caught my ear. Each track is distinct, so don’t expect that over 9 tracks. In fact, there are almost breaks, scruffy textures, and an ambient piece. Don’t fret, however. This record works because of the variety and flow, which is a overarching structural hallmark that you can identify in the moment-by-moment composition of the tracks as well. Having never heard Tommy Four Seven before this, I’m quite pleased how well done the entire thing is. Oh yeah, Berlin. ;)

I’ve been obsessed with this track the last few days, as it has dominated my stereo and completely supplanted the Big Sean (I know…) track that had been bouncing in my head. Tommy Four Seven, on Primate, trades in what he calls hard club techno. I don’t know what clubs he’s talking about, because this is some out there shit as far as I can tell. This particular track is the best on the record, one that features an industrial feel, scraping textures that surge into prominence only to give way to manipulated, polyrhythmic vocal manipulations. Once you get to the 6 minute mark, you better believe this is a fucked up track.

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